Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Kids of Breast Cancer

When my mom was going through her treatments for breast cancer, I felt very scared and alone. It was hard for me to comprehend what was going on at the time. It wasn't until her treatments were over that I realized that there were other kids of breast cancer that were probably feeling the same things I was. That is when I decided to create this website. This website is for children of all ages who has had a mother or father with breast cancer. Below you will find a list of stories from daughters of breast cancer along with the age she was when her mom was diagnosed. I hope these stories will help you in your quest for answers.
The fallowing questions were asked to these kids of breast cancer:
1. What were your initial thoughts and feelings when you first heard about your parents's diagnosis?
2. How old were you at the time?
3.Did this experience change your religious beliefs?
4.Over time, did your feelings change? How?
5.Is there anything else you would like to add?

Select a story.

Julie...age 26
Sheena...age 13
Lacey...age 9
Lucy...age 26
My mother-in-law...
Michelle...31
My Guardian Angel...14
Andrea...17
Beth...18
Stage 4 is the Hardest
Mother...22
It Happened to Me
My Mother's Story
Antoinette...18
9 Years Old
Moms Long Fight Against Breast Cancer
My Mothers Wish was Fulfilled
My Story...28
Cousin
My Story...3
My Story...19
My Story...35
My mother...the firghter...12
Jamie...17


Helpful Links


If you would like to contribute your story you can e-mail it to me by clicking here Send Your Story.get this gear!
Please use the questions above as a guide when writing your story.


Julie...age 26

1. Initial thoughts & feelings about my mom's diagnosis? "Oh, shit." Beyond that, I wasn't nearly as uptight as I probably should have been because to my mind, it was always treatable and curable. I never truly considered otherwise. That may have been major denial on my part, but it is genuinely how I felt. I simply knew that while life would really suck for a while, Mom would get better. My biggest stress was in being so far away and not being able to do anything. (Loving someone who's sick is sometimes harder than being sick - as an engineer I always want to FIX things!)
2. I was about 26 I think? (Easy to repress, isn't it)
3. The experience had absolutely zero effect on my religious beliefs - I was a good agnostic (mayso, maybeno, and I'm not going to worry about it) when Mom got cancer, and I remain a good agnostic today.
4. My greatest feeling change came a year after my Mom finished chemo, when I myself was diagnosed with lupus nephritis and had to go thru chemo. Since Mom is in Ohio and I'm in CT, I knew she was having a tough time but I wasn't actually there to see it. It wasn't until I had to have chemo myself, and could call Mom for support, that I really appreciated what she went thru. It's the day-to-day stuff that is the most miserable, and I wished I could have been closer to help deal with that; just as I wished she was closer to help me deal w/ it. The phone is great, but inadequate. The one thing that didn't change so much as become reinforced was my understanding of what an incredible person my Mom is. Having been thru chemo myself, I know that when someone says "I don't know how you do it" or "you're so strong" the only answer is "What choice do I have?" But even so, my Mom, in this as in so many other things, was a real inspiration to me. And with her on-going work developing breast cancer informational brochures and assistance, I know she is for others as well.

Top

Sheena...age 13

I was 13 when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer. It hit me like a ton of bricks. The first thing I thought was, "It can't be MY mom with CANCER!" CANCER, that word had never seemed so ugly before then. The more I tried to make myself tell my friends, the harder it got. I eventually told myself they would understand anyway and just gave up on the whole idea of telling them. (I realize now that that was a mistake.) There were a lot of nights I cried my self to sleep. It was the only time all day that felt I could allow myself to cry. I didn't want to cry in front of my mom; she had enough to worry about, I didn't want her to have to worry about me, too. I didn't think my friends would understand, so I didn't let myself cry in front of them either. I also kept myself busy during the day so I didn't have to think about it. At night, it caught up with me.
I also had a little, brown, curly-haired stuffed dog. I saw him staring at me form inside the Hallmark store window just shortly after my mom's diagnosis. I bought him and he became one of my best friends. He dried my tears at night when I cried and all listened when I talked.
It took me about a year after my mom was diagnosed to get over the denial and to talk to people about it. At the time I thought I was the only one experiencing these feelings, but now I realize that I wasn't alone. I found that there are a lot of daughters of breast cancer.

Top

Lacey...age 9

When I first heard that my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer, I guess I really didn't know what it meant and what was going to happen. It really hit me when my mom was always at the doctors and when she had her first chemo. My sister and I took on much more chores. When went out to eat and ordered in a lot. My dad is not a cook and Sheena couldn't cook all the time, she was only 14. I was 9-years-old.
The part I remember the most is when my mom had to give herself shoots and had tube, which contained some of her blood. I have no idea what it was for, and I'm not a blood person. It changed my life but not to the extent that I'm paranoid. Nothing happened like that.

Top

Lucy...age 26

When I heard about my mother's breast cancer I was 26 years old and she was 60. The thought of her having cancer shocked me and I just wanted to be with her and make sure she would be ok. I remember visiting her in the hospital after surgery. She had tubes going in and tubes coming out but she was the same person I always knew her to be. She put me at ease and we talked like normal. I lived and worked away from home so I didn't experience the day in and day out routine. My father was an M.D. and I think it comforted my mom to have him managing her care. I don't remember anyone like a pastor being involved at all. My mother had always gone to the local Methodist Church but I don't remember if she had anyone visit. I wasn't attending a church at the time and did not seek comfort there. The word was that the doctor had gotten it all and she would be OK.
That summer I decided I would travel and move back a bit closer to home. I remember thinking of moving to the west coast just prior to this but I ruled that out because I wanted to stay closer to home.
Later I remember being very angry with the doctor that operated on her. She had a terrible scar. It interfered with practically every neckline she could wear, except for a turtleneck that she never liked. It went from her clavicle practically to her waist. And it was thick and lumpy. I don't think the surgeon was the least interested in the quality of my mother's life after the operation. And her arm swelled so much. She had to have a specially made glove and garment to combat the swelling. It was hot and uncomfortable for her. Eventually she gave up on it and just accepted the damage her body had taken.

I knew that I would have to watch out for breast cancer myself. I tried to live a healthy life style by eating my broccoli, exercising and doing self-checks. But that's another story.

Top

My mother-in-law...

My mother-in-law is going through it right now. I remember the first call that just told us there was a lump that is when I really cried. I was scared. Then we found out that it was cancer. I had heard about it but it really didn't bother me until someone I know and love found they had it. I've always hated cancer. It makes you ask the age-old question why does bad things happen to good people? Well, after seeing how my mother in law has taken this really well I out behind my negative thoughts. She tells us that she isn't going anywhere until they find her a cure. But what we do know is that even though modern science hasn't come up with one yet, we have our own. God is the cure. Remember never give up. My mother in law is the happiest and nicest person I've met cancer was a set back but she won't stay down!

Top

Michelle...31

Mom mother was just had her breast removed last Monday. I am 31 years old one of 5 children. We are all over the age of 25. I was very shocked to find out that my mother had cancer. I thought just as people have always thought, this can't be happening to our family! Well it has, and I still cannot believe it. My mother is not a very strong person, and I was very surprised to see her handle this situation so well. I feel that she is handling better than the rest of us. My mother has to start chemo soon and I am very sad about this, I know there is nothing anyone can do, but I feel helpless. I am also scared that it could come back someday. We all love her very much and I pray that we will have her around for many years to come. I am expecting my second child after 12 years of a mother of only one. I pray that she will be around to see this one grow up too. Thanks for listening to my fears. I will pray for all of you to get through breast cancer with someone you love, and please send your prayers to my mom too. Thanks......Michelle

Top

My Guardian Angel...14

When my mother got breast cancer I really wasn't sure what to think. She didn't act like it was a big deal, and she didn't want me to worry about it. I was 14 years old at the time and never really thought my mom of all people could get breast cancer. She was soo strong in my eyes that nothing could faze her. As far as religion, it totally changed my life! My mom grew up being catholic and she soo desperately wanted me to be catholic also, and I was never baptized when I was a baby. So we went through a bunch of classes together and this was all while she was fighting breast cancer, and she started losing her battle to breast cancer and she was on oxygen and all I could do, all she would let me do, was watch her slip through my fingers. But she was going to do anything she had to, to se me get baptized. I finally got baptized and she was there, oxygen and all. It was a beautiful service it was soo special to me! But the only thing I was afraid of was I thought she would let go after my baptism and felt like she had nothing to live for anymore she got done what she wanted to get done; and that was to make sure I had someone to turn to when things got bad. What I suspected is what happened my mom got worse and finally she did let go, but right before she died I told her," Mommy its okay to go I know you'll be watching over me because your my Guardian Angel. "And I no longer feel pain because I know she's in a better place.

Top

Andrea...17

I was 17 years old when my mom was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. She had to have her left breast removed. She also had to do the Chemotherapy. She lost all of her hair and it made her very sick. After one year they told her it was gone. But she still had to go back and forth to the doctor for a year to make sure it was gone. Then in 1998 they told her she had a small spot on her chest wall. She then had to do more treatments, including radiation. This year they told her that she now has it in her left lung and part of her liver. She is doing more treatments and fighting harder every day. I love her very much and I believe it is affecting the rest of us as much as it is affecting her. For us to have to just sit back with nothing for us to do to help. But we are doing all we can to make sure she has everything she needs and all the help with cooking and cleaning. The battle is very hard. I hope that everyone who is suffering realizes that there is a brighter day.

Top

Beth...18

My name is Beth; I was 18 when my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was nineteen when she died with it. My initial thought at first was that she would be okay, nothing would ever happen to my Mom! She had a left mastectomy and no further treatment was advised by her Doctors because it was not found in her Lymph Nodes. A year later the cancer had spread almost everywhere, and she was gone. Yes, I did loose all my faith in God. How could he take my mother? I am a little better now, I am trying to restore I am 28 years old now, and I worry every single day of life that I will get breast cancer. I do not think that is a fear I can escape. Sometimes it is so overpowering. I do not want to leave my daughter and that thought kills me.

Top

Stage 4 is the Hardest

My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer 4 yrs. ago (my freshman yr. in high school). In the beginning it looked hopeful, she even went into remission once but it came back, spread, and now she is reaching the end. Everyone tries there best to understand and give advice but none of them have ever gone through this. I feel like the only one this age (18) with a mother in this condition. If there is anyone out there going through this or that has been through it that is or was close in age please e-mail me. I need to talk to someone who's been there.

Top

Mother...22

I was 22 yrs old with a nine-month-old baby girl when my mom (44yrs) told us she had breast cancer. She tried to ease our minds and tell us the doctors will get it and everything will be ok. Of course she is my mom and I believe every thing she says so I said ok, everything is all right. I still worried but trusted what she said. I was never really a religious person I believed in God but It took this to realize that Doctors are great and all but it's all in his hands. Mom had her surgery and did not feel that she needed "chemo" the chances of it coming back with or without it were about the same (said the doctors). All her lymph nodes were clear so everything seemed ok. Now I am 23 she's just 45 my little girl is almost 2. My mom's cancer has come back in her neck she woke up one morning and thought she just had a crick in it; it took months to figure out what it was. She has just finished her radiation and has to have some other stuff done. And I hope and pray everything will get taken care of and for anyone reading this who's loved one may have cancer please don't let this story scare you but maybe help you. Please say a prayer for my mom and everybody else with this terrible thing they call cancer. Thank you.

Top

It Happened to Me

I knew about the lump my senior year of high school. My mother brushed it aside. Said she’s had it since she was pregnant with me. It was a mammary gland that never shrunk back after breast-feeding. It wasn’t something to be concerned with. The summer I graduated from college, my mother entered menopause and was put on hormone therapy. During a breast self-exam, she noticed the lump had grown. We reassured one another that everything would be fine. It was probably the particular hormone they put her on. Or maybe it was just part of her menopause, like a hot flash. Her OBGYN recommended a biopsy [tissue sample taken to determine if the cancerous cells are found within the mass-"lump"]. I was in my first year as an advertising assistant at the job I got after graduation; just about to sign a lease on my first apartment. I got the call at work. The biopsy revealed malignant cells. Cancer. My mother has cancer. In her breast. I lost it, right there in my supervisor’s office. I just completely burst into tears. My company was great about the whole thing. It was right before a huge annual presentation and the workload would be demanding. Yet, they gave me as much time as I needed to go with my mother to her doctor’s appointment with a specialist at Sloan Kettering, one of the best cancer treatment centers in the world, located just blocks away in Manhattan. Our first appointment with Dr. Van Zee was to get a recommendation on what to do next. Both of us were placing our hopes on the best-case scenario - a lumpectomy [procedure in which the breast tumor - "lump" is completely removed, preserving the appearance of the breast]. Randy Gross, Dr. Van Zee’s fabulous RN, brought us into a private waiting room and took us through my mother’s medical file, updating her information. He tried to make us comfortable while we waited for an examination room to open up. The polite and forced small talk had run out hours ago. By this time we were just trying to casually avoid the surgical before and after shot photo album lying on the table between us. I tried my best to show no emotion or horror at those pictures when we finally decided to take a look. Because of the size of the lump (it had grown to 5cm) and the fact that my mother is small chested (she wears a 34A), Dr. Van Zee recommended a radical mastectomy [removal of the breast and surrounding lymph nodes as well as pectoral muscles if necessary] of her left breast and the removal of all the lymph nodes in the armpit. The surgery was scheduled immediately at Sloan Kettering’s surgical center. My mother would have to stay in the hospital for a few days. Just as I saw my mother into surgery, my cousin arrived at the hospital to wait out the 3-hour procedure. Dr. Van Zee called me from the operating room to tell me that everything went well. They had removed the lump and surrounding tissue and that cancer had also been found in three of the lymph nodes. We could see her in the recovery room. Crystal and I awkwardly walked into the recovery room with flowers and balloons, overwhelmed by the sight of twenty gurneys full of adults our parents’ age coming out of surgery, their various states of consciousness and bandaging. My mother’s gurney was at the far end of the room. I’m afraid to know the look on my face when we found her. As the anesthesia began to wear off, she smiled at the balloons we’d tied to the bed, and gratefully sucked on the wet sponge lollipop I kept spoon-feeding her. She looked me coherently in the eye and mustered "Bet you didn’t think we’d be in this situation [role reversal] so soon." I gave her the smallest of smiles in return. Although Dr. Van Zee was confident she’d removed all the cancer, chemotherapy and radiation treatments were necessary as a precaution against reoccurrence. As the scars from the mastectomy began to fade, my mother lost all her hair. She was nauseas. Her bones ached and she was severely fatigued. But, my mother’s a fighter. Armed with a wig, prosthetic breast, affectionately referred to as her [chicken] "Cutlet" and an arsenal of pink ribbons, she was determined to beat this. We were ecstatic to learn that the cancer was in remission, nearly a year later. My mother’s hair grew back. She started to gain back the weight chemo had taken off. Life became normal again. Then this spring she began to feel pain in her left hip. Dr. Bowland, a bone cancer specialist at Sloan Kettering broke the news that X-rays and MRI results had revealed cancer in the ball of her left hip. The cells matched that of her breast cancer. Surgery was scheduled a week later. Dr. Bowland informed us that she had to have her hip and femur (thigh bone) replaced with prosthetics. The cancer had already caused my mother’s hip ball to shatter and she was admitted within a few days. This was a much more evasive surgery than the mastectomy. She was in recovery for hours and stayed in the hospital for a week. My mother had to relearn how to walk, requiring intensive physical rehabilitation. By fall, my mother was walking without her cane. She went for a follow-up with her oncologist and got the results of her new MRI taken before the surgery. The cancer had spread. It was in the remaining hip, liver, breastbone and lungs. It was declared Stage IV disease. It was terminal. On September 11th, I lost a friend in the WTC attacks. Less than a month later I learned that I was losing my mother to a fatal disease. Unlike with Shelly, I have the time to share, laugh, love and say goodbye. During college, I’d rebelled from my mother and we’d grown distant. This experience has caused my mother and me to make amends in our relationship. We’re not just mother and daughter. We’re also great friends. I may be terrified of the cancer’s progression, but determined to embrace life and cherish the time I have left with her. No matter what is to come, the cancer will not win.

Top

My Mother's Story

My mother’s story starts back in 1994 when she found a lump in her left breast. She had a procedure called a lumpectomy only taking the lump. She went through the radiations and chemos for about a year. She was also taking a pill that she was supposed to take for five years. My mother was very healthy and very loving. In Sept. of 2000 my mom was having back problems that she thought a chiropractor could help with. The doctor told her to go see her regular doctor and find out what was going on. She went in for and MRI and found that the breast cancer had spread though her back. My family had no idea that she was really sick until she said she was just going to go through 3 weeks of radiation. She said everything would be okay until the last treatment burned through to her rectum. Two weeks prior to her passing, I received a letter from my grandma saying she was in the hospital. It was very hard to see her laying there in the bed and not being able to tell us how much she loved us and how much pain she was in. The day she passed away my brother and I both had this feeling of clam and warmth. This March 16th will be a year and I can't believe she is not here. She was only 57 when she died. She left behind 2 wonderful grandsons who love her very much.

Top

Antoinette...18

My name is Antoinette and I am 18 years old. I have lived in Illinois all my life, so when I graduated high school I decided to move to Florida and get a fresh start. It was really hard for me to do because my mom and I are very close. In November of 2001 my mom called me and told me that they found a lump in her breast, but not to worry because it probably wasn't cancer. Needless to say my heart sank, I felt sick to my stomach and immediately started crying...I got on the first plane back home, and showed up and my mom started crying and hugging me. The doctor told her he wanted to go right in and do a lumpectomy. When the surgery was over we had to wait a couple days to find the results out and those days seemed liked weeks. Everyone was on edge. We got the results back, and not only was it cancer, but he found two tumors, plus they had to do surgery to remove her lymph nodes under her left armpit and we found out those were cancerous too. When I heard that all I kept saying to myself was how could this be my mom, she's such a great person and does so many good things, maybe if I could have been there things wouldn't have worked out this way. I just kept trying to find a logical reason as to why it was happening to her, but there is no explanation. She's going through chemo right now and I went home again and it made me cry to see her with no hair. I know she has a long road ahead of her, but she is strong and she will make it through this and I will be by her side the whole time. I love her and I wouldn't trade her for anything, not to mention my dad is being the best husband...husband and wife for better or worse till death do them part...these vows actually meant something to them.

Top

9 Years Old

1. Initial thoughts and feelings? It was a very difficult time. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at 37 yrs. old. I was very young. I didn't understand why my mother couldn't be home. My father tried to explain what was happening to her, but no amount of explanation made me feel any better. I wanted my mother home. She stayed in and out of the hospital at first, they did surgery and removed one breast. The Dr. said they removed all the cancer and sent her home a while later. A few more months passed and it showed back up, but had spread throughout her entire body, by then it was too late for anything more. She had undergone numerous chemo treatments that were so strong it left 3rd degree burns on her chest. It was so painful for her, that she wouldn't do Chemo any longer. The medicine didn't work for the pain, the Dr. wanted her to smoke marijuana, she refused. She was a strong woman and fought a battle that not many women would do. What has always bothered me most, Is she died when I was in school, I never got a hug, a kiss, or was able to tell her G-bye. My father got us girls from school and took us to the hospital, He never said a word, but when we arrived back at the hospital, I can still remember the fear I felt as he parked the car. We knew without him shedding a tear or saying anything. All I had hoped for during the time of her being sick, was that I could tell her how much I loved her, I wanted that last chance to say goodbye, and I always felt like that was stolen from me. I have Great admiration and respect for my mother.

2. How old were you at the time? It was after I turned 9 when she was diagnosed, and she past away shortly after I turned 10. This disease spread so rapidly she only had 9 months.

3,4. Did this experience change your religious beliefs? Of Course, when something like this happens, one tends to question their beliefs, and why God would take someone at such an early age. For quite some time, I cursed God and everyone for taking my mother. I didn't understand, it seemed unfair, unjust and cruel to me. I felt as though I had done something wrong. It wasn't until I was Baptized as the age of 22 that I came to fully understand it. I can't say I understand why she got sick, but I understand why he took her. She couldn't take the pain anymore, and now I know she's in a better place. It still very difficult for me even though I'm 30yr. old now.

5.Is there anything else you would like to add? For anyone out there, that knows someone battling Cancer. Stay by their side, help in anyway you can, TREASURE the moments you have with them because it may very well be your last. When the battle is over, do what you can to ease the pain of someone else. Cancer patients and families alike are all connected. We all suffer, we know the pain, and how difficult it is to move on. We should all help each other.

Top

Moms Long Fight Against Breast Cancer

My mom first got diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002. When I found out about it, I had no idea what to think. I thought it was the end of my world. My mom had a mastectomy on her right breast. Everything went pretty well after that. She started chemo and radiation to get rid of any cancer cells that might have been left. When she started chemo it was awful, she was constantly sick. I felt so sorry for her. Her radiation went pretty well though. She finished off her chemo and radiation, they then did test to see if it was all gone. They said that they got it all. But 6 months later she devoted bone cancer apparently there were still cancer cells left. She started chemo and radiation for the second time. It was awful. She did pretty good though with all that was happening to her. The cancer would not quit growing it was in all of her bones, and progressing to her liver. It got to the point where there was nothing else they could do. She fought cancer for 2 years. She is the strongest women I will ever know. She did pass on Nov 27,2002. She died from breast cancer. We miss you mom.

Top

My Mothers Wish was Fulfilled

My mother's cancer was misdiagnosed and later turned to be stage 4 cancer-her inspiration was to survive and fight for 8 years to just see her grandchildren born and start walking and talking, you are never too old to want your mother! When she decided after 7 1/2 years chemo was too much and radiation she asked us to support her in not continuing her treatment- we respect that and in her last days she had her family with her and went quickly and peacefully. Her wish was never to be bed ridden and she walked herself inside the hospital where she was treated for fluid in her lungs and heart, was comfortable and passed in her sleep few days later in the hospital March 06, 2002. We miss her terribly but she lives on in her grandchildren- her only regret was she would not see them grow up. My son is now 3yrs old.

Top

My Story...28

I was 28 when my mom went for her routine mammogram. We have a strong family history of breast cancer, my grandmother passed away 4 years prior to my mom finding hers. My sister also had a double mastectomy at 28 and my great aunt had it too. Therefore I felt very alone... I am the only one on my mom's side that is cancer free, (so far) I was very scared of losing her. After watching Grandma fight the battle and still she lost it was very fresh in my mind. My mother was very upbeat during the whole process and she just finished chemo 4 weeks ago. So far she has a clean bill of health and she has given me a new outlook on breast cancer. I have made an appointment for my first mammogram and I know now it is not a death sentence. I may need to take extra precautions than other women but I do understand that I can deal with breast cancer if I ever need to.

Top

Cousin

I was at work today and my cousin told me that her sister, my cousin has Stage 4 cancer. I am not really sure about Stage 4 or what that means. I am not familiar with the cancer subject. I am very concerned and scared for my cousin. She has a daughter and a son to look after and the children's lives are hanging in the balance right now. We aren't really sure what her outcome will be. I also found out that she is pregnant right now...So she has a full plate of issues to sort through. She says that she doesn’t want any treatment. She just wants to wait it out and see what happens. I am not sure that her decision is the best for her or the unborn life growing inside her. I want her to have her life back but I see that her life is not going to be the same, whatever the outcome...

Top

My Story...3

When my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer I was three years old and she was 27. She was so young, which is what makes this story so important for others to heed. Although I don't remember her first diagnosis, I know her doctor gave her 8 months to live. She had a full mastectomy, and after eight months, she was still going strong. My mom was such a strong-willed woman... after much chemotherapy, she went into remission for 6 years. Then the worst happened again, a recurrence, in her lung. I was so confused... I had heard the stories about her first cancer, but I was now nine years old. I couldn't imagine my life without my mother. She promised that she would never give up on us. That gave me such comfort, I learned to trust her vigor and hunger for life. She went into a second remission a year later. This pattern seemed to repeat endlessly. Her recurrences moved to her abdomen and colon, she endured TWO bone marrow transplants. She seriously is the most heroic woman I have ever known. The last time the cancer recurred was 3 years ago. She fought so bravely. Too bravely for people to say she lost her battle with breast cancer. She didn't lose her battle, she just completed it on April 18th, 2002, a year ago next week. I was a senior in high school, a month from graduation, a week from prom. It was the most trying time in my life, but I remembered back to that first diagnosis. 8 months. No sir, not for my mom, she preferred 15 years thank you. Those scary predictions made me cry so many times as a kid, but I so valued the honesty of my parents. Nothing was ever kept from me spare gory details. I knew what was happening to my mommy, where she was, and why. That above all was the most comfort I could receive. What I want children of breast cancer soldiers to know is to believe your loved one. Doctors are third to God and the human spirit. Never let anyone tell you that you are too young for any health problem. Trust your instinct. I know if my mom were here that would be in capital letters.. so TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS. Her cancer may not have been so difficult had her first three doctors looked past her age. Beyond that, I urge others affected by breast cancer to stay involved, promote prevention, and always remember those who have fought before us.

Top

My Story...19

I was 19 years old when my mom died of breast cancer. I was shocked when I heard that my mom had cancer and I think that I was shocked so much that I denied the fact that she might have a chance to die. I really believed that she would live through it. I was already very religious at this time, and having this faith helped me through her passing. If it was not for God carrying me through that time I might have not made it through. I continually blamed myself for her death. Thinking that if I were a better son she would have made it through this time. I felt that I should have treated her better and spent more time with her. Over time I started to realize that these thoughts were wrong. It was her time to go. She had suffered enough and God wanted her to be in heaven. I am happy for the time that I got to spend with her. It is a lot longer than some kids get. I also realized that I was not the only one that lost a mother to cancer. It has happened to a lot of kids. All I know is that I would do anything for 5 more minutes with her.

Top

My Story...35

My Mom was diagnosed with cancer when she was 70 years old, I was 35. She had not been to a Doctor for 10 years when she finally decided it was time to go. We are all very lucky that she decided to go when she did as they detected a very small lump in her left breast. She opted for the mastectomy as she did not want to through radiation therapy, she just wanted to get it over with. I was surprised at her strength as she is someone who gets upset over the smallest of things. She has survived 12 years and is now 82 years old and I am 47. Ever since my mother was diagnosed, I knew that someday I would probably get breast cancer, only I figured I would be older like her. So I put off doing the mammograms until 3 years ago. It was a good thing I finally started to have them as this year (2003) a small lump was detected in my left breast, and it was cancer. I opted for the lumpectomy and radiation treatment (just finished 4th week of radiation). I have a 7 year old that doesn't really understand what is going on, only that his mom is going to the Doctor a lot and that he has to be careful with mommy’s left side. I have a good chance of survival as it was not in the lymph nodes, and it was also very, small stage 1. But there is always a chance it could come back. At this point, I am hoping that I will live long enough for my son to remember me, long enough to see him graduate, and if I am really lucky, long enough to see him get married and see some grandkids. Every day now, I feel lucky to be alive. All I want to say to all the girls/women is, DO NOT put off going for your mammogram when you turn 40, or if you feel a lump before then, be sure to have it checked out. It could save your life.

Top

My mother...the firghter...12

I was I was 12 when my mother was diagnosed with Breast Cancer in October of 1999. We had just gotten into the car after one of many divorce hearings between my parents. It was my sister, mother, and I. She had just gotten off of the phone with her doctor when she told us that she had breast cancer. I knew of the disease because my Grandmother had it and survived it, but I did not know what it was besides a killer. When she said those fateful words, "I have Breast Cancer..." I knew that our lives would change forever. They say ignorance is bliss, but in this case ignorance could lead to death. I was so angry at God for giving my mother this disease that could tear her away from our family. I wanted to scream and shout and just hit something.... but this twelve year old had to keep it together so that I could show my mother that I would not give up and neither should she. After many late night breakdown's and many surgeries and chemo/radiation treatments she was given a clean bill of health.... Then it cam back again.... and again.... This is the THIRD TIME she has had to deal with this evil. I feel so angry because it won't leave her alone, won't let us live normal lives. But I have come to accept it... She used to be a paramedic and a volunteer firefighter... now she is a police officer... I am so proud of her. She saves people's lives and he fights for her own at the same time... Cancer has shown me that my other is one of the strongest people I have ever met... She (we) will survive once again......

Top

Jamie...17

My Name is Jamie and I’m almost 18, my mother died of breast cancer on July 14th 2004, I turn 18 in September. For the last 2 years my mother has been on kemo. She fought hard, throughout her fight the thought of her dying never came to mind because it was negative thinking, if theirs one thing my mom taught me it was to always be positive. I have a sister who is 14 and I worry she feels worse than I do, which is horrible, but seeing her happy makes me happy, This website also makes me happy because it lets me know theirs others who have had a similar loss as me, nobody knows what it's like until it happens and when it happens it's forever, so when someone is ill and in jeopardy of losing their life act the same as you would towards them any other day but with more love then ever before , because all that love that you give stays with you after they are gone and when their gone that love is the only thing that gets you through the day.

Top
Helpful Links

Here are some links to other helpful sites.